Down and Dirty of Clean Eating // The Basics

//This is the second post in a blog mini-series called “The Down and Dirty of Clean Eating.” To learn more about the DDoCE series, check out the previous post here. Everything I share here is based off my journey in clean eating. Check with your doc before doing anything crazy. // SONY DSC I am stoked, guys. I’ve been mulling over the idea to do a series like this for a few months and I’m so excited to see so many of you so excited about taking steps toward a healthier foundation of health. I want to reiterate that I’m not an expert and we don’t eat a perfect diet. I bribe my kids with cookies like the best of us. But we strive for the best diet without compromising sanity (which is a hot commodity in these parts).

I’m going to be upfront and say there’s a lot of debate around what constitutes a “clean” diet. There are different definitions and some items I consider clean maybe debated by others and vice versa. There is usually a good, better and best to all of life’s choices but starting a healthier lifestyle is based on where you are. At its most basic form, here is my list for clean eating:

1. Eat more real food in it’s real form. Fruits, vegetables, meats, nuts, grains as close to nature as possible.

2. Buy foods with an ingredient list you can understand. Better yet? Make it yourself so you know exactly what is being used. Prime example? Bread.

3. Skip calories, count nutrients. Choose foods that are nutrient-dense which means they offer a lot of vitamins, minerals, protein, fiber or food fat in comparison the amount of calories.

4. Eat with intention. Food can – and should – be fun. But it’s primary purpose is to provide the body with the energy and resources it needs to function properly. The simpler my diet, the more it became something I believed in and a tangible reflection of what I believed about nutrition and health.

It sounds simple enough, right? Or maybe it doesn’t sound simple at all. Putting these principals into practice can be confusing. Nearly every person I talk to says they’d love to eat better but feel so overwhelmed by all the rules. Gluten is evil, organic is best, avoid GMOs, buy grass-fed beef, stay away from sugar, only rbst-free milk. Many of them overlap and/or contradict and honestly, it’s easier to stick our fingers in our ears and rationalize that they way we eat really isn’t all that bad.

I want to help you not feel overwhelmed. Start small. Those changes toward a clear diet will snowball. Or, you’re like me. I have an obsessive personality. When I find something that I’m interested in or a goal to achieve, I’m like a race horse out of the gate and work to master it quickly. While that passion is fantastic, I also tend to become easily frustrated and hard on myself when things don’t go the way I imagined. I preach patience and practice to my children and yet fail to do so as an adult.

The best way I’ve found to combat the urge to go out guns blazing without losing the motivation is simple:

Preparation and planning leads to consistency.

You don’t sign up for a marathon if you’ve never even laced up your running shoes. You prepare. Please don’t click out of this window and throw out everything in your pantry. Read labels. Read books. A great place to start? Michael Pollan’s In Defense of Food. In 2009, this was one of the first books that made me reconsider everything I thought I knew about food. Talk to people. Be realistic. Figure out your barriers.

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I wrote a post about this way back when but it deserves another mention. Don’t confuse dieting with being on a diet.

diet [dahy-it], noun: food and drink considered in terms of its qualities, composition, and its effects on health.   You should be on a diet.   I’m not talking about calorie restrictions or eating low-fat frozen foods (can we even consider that food?). A diet means thinking about your food – what it is, where it’s from – and eating with intention – providing your body with the forms of energy it needs to run optimally.   People would balk at the suggestion of putting dirty, unrefined gasoline in their brand new, shiny SUV. So what’s up with all the processed crap we eat?

Let’s chat. Do you find all the food rules to be overwhelming? What are your basics for a clean diet?

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2 thoughts on “Down and Dirty of Clean Eating // The Basics

  1. Pingback: The Down and Dirty of Clean Eating // The Budget | The Lambent Life

  2. Pingback: Down and Dirty of Clean Eating // Meal Planning | The Lambent Life

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